Kenneth Jolly

Professor of History
Department of History
Arts & Behavioral Sciences
Academic and Student Affairs

SVSU Main Campus
Brown Hall 305
989-964-2083
kjolly@svsu.edu

Biography

Kenneth Jolly joined the History Department at Saginaw Valley State University in 2004. He earned his Ph.D. in African American history from the University of Missouri, Columbia. Jolly is a Professor of History and Advisor of the Black Studies degree at Saginaw Valley State University where he teaches courses in African American history, Africana Studies, Black Liberation Movements, the African Diaspora, and U.S. History.

Jolly is the author of “By Our Own Strength”: William Sherrill, the UNIA and the Fight for African American Self-Determination in Detroit (Peter Lang Academic Publishing Group, Black Studies and Critical Thinking Series, 2013); and Black Liberation in the Midwest: The Struggle in St. Louis, Missouri, 1964-1970 (Routledge, African American History and Culture Series, 2006). Jolly has also published articles and reviews in several academic journals and edited book collections and presented his work at numerous academic conferences. His current research continues to explore local expressions of Black Nationalism and Black Liberation through the 20th century.

Education

Doctor of Philosophy
Univ Missouri

Teaching Interests

Jolly is a Professor of History and Advisor of the Black Studies degree at Saginaw Valley State University where he teaches courses in African American history, Africana Studies, Black Liberation Movements, the African Diaspora, and U.S. History.

Research

Jolly is the author of “By Our Own Strength”: William Sherrill, the UNIA and the Fight for African American Self-Determination in Detroit (Peter Lang Academic Publishing Group, Black Studies and Critical Thinking Series, 2013); and Black Liberation in the Midwest: The Struggle in St. Louis, Missouri, 1964-1970 (Routledge, African American History and Culture Series, 2006). Jolly has also published articles and reviews in several academic journals and edited book collections and presented his work at numerous academic conferences. His current research continues to explore local expressions of Black Nationalism and Black Liberation through the 20th century.

Honors and Awards

2008 - Franc A. Landee Award for Teaching Excellence
2008 - Faculty Association Community Service Award
2006 - Roosevelt Ruffin Diversity Award
2006 - Michigan Campus Compact Faculty Community Service-Learning Award
2005 - T